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first_imgSAN FRANCISCO — Less than an hour after multiple outlets reported that Joe Panik is heading home to New York, the Giants decided to bring a local product back to the Bay Area.The organization announced Friday that it claimed Santa Clara native and St. Mary’s College product Kyle Barraclough off waivers. Barraclough will report to Triple-A Sacramento and has been added to the 40-man roster.The Giants designated Panik for assignment earlier this week and the infielder has reportedly agreed to …last_img read more

first_img“It is now time to roll up our sleeves and get down to business,” acting CEO of the GCIS, Phumla Williams in her latest opinion piece.With this year’s general elections successfully concluded, proving South Africa as a resilient, strong and vibrant democracy, it is now time to roll up our sleeves and get down to business.      The task at hand is to grow the economy and ensure that South Africans attain a decent standard of living by eliminating the triple challenge of poverty, unemployment and inequality. The nation has spoken through the ballot; the country is preparing to inaugurate the fifth democratically elected President on Saturday who will form a government to lead the country towards development.In this regard we are able to seize the opportunity as the National Development Plan (NDP) – our long term growth and development framework over the next 16 years – clearly details our course of action.The plan enables the incoming administration to focus on implementation immediately after taking office. It informs the 2014 – 2019 Medium Term Strategic Framework, which will give departments precise targets for the next five years.At the heart of the plan is the creation of opportunities and building capabilities that enable South Africans themselves to lead the lives they desire. It also enhances the capacity of the state and promotes partnerships.The plan identifies improving the quality of education, health and nutrition, skills development, safer communities and innovation as key priorities. It singles out the provision of physical infrastructure such as schools, clinics, power stations and transport and moves us away from a paradigm of entitlement to one that draws on the energies of South Africans for our own development.Government encourages all South Africans to familiarise themselves with the plan’s vision and objectives so that they can participate in its implementation. Let us engage the plan at every opportunity.We call on our youths as the future leaders to make the Vision 2030 a part of their  lives so they can help define the country they want to live in.We encourage grades 10, 11 and 12 to study the plan as this will help them with their career planning, as they will understand the vision of the country.Through our combined effort we will ensure its successful implementation. There is nothing more inspiring than working collectively to build our country.President Jacob Zuma said: “We must continue working together to build the South Africa of our dreams. Informed by the National Development Plan, we must continue to build a South Africa which inspires people to achieve greater things for themselves and for their country.”The development plan sets out ambitious goals for poverty reduction, economic growth, and transformation and job creation. The plan is in line with the New Growth Path and charts the way to faster economic growth, higher investment and job creation.It aims to create an additional 11 million jobs and reduce unemployment to 6 per cent by 2030. The plan calls for expansion of the public works programmes, lowering the cost of doing business and matching unemployed workers to jobs.The plan has mapped the route we need to follow and our performance monitoring and evaluation function will assist in keeping us on track.However, government cannot achieve Vision 2030 on its own. We require partnerships with all sectors and call upon them to support the implementation of the plan.Government welcomes the pledge by Business Unity South Africa to support the implementation of the plan. The pledge is a step in the right direction as the private sector has an important role to help us realise Vision 2030.The effective implementation of the plan holds enormous benefits for the private sector and offers predictability and new investment opportunities.There needs to be a high degree of collaboration between business and government for the plan to succeed.  Government has stated its commitment to the plan, and it is important that all sectors do the same.The development plan offers an opportunity for united action because it has the support of South Africans across the political and cultural spectrum. It allows every South African to rise above sectional interests and pull together to take our country forward. Phumla Williams is Acting CEO of the Government Communication and Information System (GCIS) Courtesy of  www.SANews.gov.zalast_img read more

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Another cold day today over the state, but we should see some better sunshine potential through the day, as winds shift just a bit, and we see less of an influence from the Great Lakes. The only place we will not back away from lake influence today is in NE  Ohio, where we expect clouds and lake effect snow potential to linger though at least midday. For the rest of us, we suggest you don’t get used to any sun you see, today. Clouds roll back in tomorrow and we finish the week with a significant rain maker. Tomorrow, with the clouds, we can’t rule out some minor precipitation. However, it looks like for the most part, Thursday action will be limited to far northern areas of the state and far southern Ohio. In fact, the middle three quarters of the state probably just sees clouds through the day tomorrow. Up north, we cant rule out light snow showers, and we can see both sprinkles and flurries in the south. AS warm air starts to work in over the state, we will see better chances of liquid precipitation over frozen a the day wears on. Overnight tomorrow night through midday Friday we see another wave of moisture that can trigger a few hundredths to .1″ of liquid. The balance of Friday stays cloudy, as temps continue to warm. Big rains arrive early Saturday, sweeping across the state through the day and overnight Saturday night. Strong gusty winds will accompany the rain, and we will not rule out a thunderstorm. While we see a dry slot work in farther west, on Sunday, we cant rule out precipitation over Ohio. We have to look for additional Sunday showers with about 60% coverage through midnight Sunday night. Combined rain totals for the event remain at half to 1.5” over 100% of the state. Temperatures will be well above normal for the entire weekend. Even if you happen to be in an area that misses out on most of the Sunday rains (far western and southwestern OH), half to 1.5” rains on Saturday will be more than you need. The map at right shows rain totals through Sunday night. Cold air finally blasts into the state overnight Sunday night through Monday, as we get the backside circulation coming in from the north and west. This promoted some light snow through Monday, mostly north of I-70, and we can see a fresh coating to no more than an inch. Strong north winds coming across all of the Great Lakes mean we can see some lake effect snow in far NW and northern Ohio, up in to Michigan and southern Ontario. Areas south of I-70 in southern Ohio likely just turn colder with a mix of clouds and sun. Cold air remains over the state from Tuesday through Thursday, but we are scaling back precipitation threats for Tuesday and Wednesday and leaning toward a drier forecast for those days. No change in our extended forecast this morning. There is a small chance of light snow next Friday, but coverage and amounts are underwhelming. Better precipitation rolls in for Sunday the 9th with some .25″-1″ potential (liquid equivalent) here in Ohio. Some leftover light snow falls to start the week after next on Monday, but then we turn warmer for the next three days, Tuesday through Thursday, with above normal temps. This will lead to another significant storm complex around the 15th or 16th.last_img read more

first_imgThe consequences of living bigAs middle-class houses have grown ever larger, two things have happened.First, large houses do take time to maintain. An army of cleaners and other service workers, many of them working for minimal wages, are required to keep the upscale houses in order. In some ways, we have returned to the era of even middle-class households employing low-wage servants, except that today’s servants no longer live with their employers, but are deployed by firms that provide little in the way of wages or benefits.Second, once-public spaces such as municipal pools or recreational centers, where people from diverse backgrounds used to randomly come together, have increasingly become privatized, allowing access only to carefully circumscribed groups. Even spaces that seem public are often exclusively for the use of limited populations. For example, gated communities sometimes use taxpayer funds — money that by definition should fund projects open to the public — to build amenities such as roads, parks or playgrounds that may only be used by residents of the gated community or their guests.Limiting access to amenities has had other consequences as well. An increase in private facilities for the well-off has gone hand-in-hand with a reduction of public facilities available to all, with a reduced quality of life for many.Take swimming pools. Whereas in 1950, only 2,500 U.S. families owned in-ground pools, by 1999 this number had risen to 4 million. At the same time, public municipal pools were often no longer maintained and many were shuttered, leaving low-income people nowhere to swim.Mobility opportunities have been affected, too. For example, 65% of communities built in the 1960s or earlier had public transportation; by 2005, with an increase in multi-car families, this was only 32.5%. A reduction in public transit decreases opportunities for those who do not drive, such as youth, the elderly, or people who cannot afford a car. The better housing crazeThe average single-family home built in the United States in the 1960s or before was less than 1,500 square feet in size. By 2016, the median size of a new, single-family home sold in the United States was 2,422 square feet, almost twice as large. Single-family homes built in the 1980s had a median of six rooms. By 2000, the median number of rooms was seven. What’s more, homes built in the 2000s were more likely than earlier models to have more of all types of spaces: bedrooms, bathrooms, living rooms, family rooms, dining rooms, dens, recreation rooms, utility rooms and, as the number of cars per family increased, garages.Today, homebuilding companies promote these expanding spaces — large yards, spaces for entertainment, private swimming pools, or even home theaters — as needed for recreation and social events. Ten Ways to Improve a New HomeA Better Way to Encourage Efficient New HomesWhat’s the Definition of ‘Green Building’?Houses Are Getting Bigger and Pricier Each home a castle?Living better is not only defined as having more space, but also as having more and newer products. Since at least the 1920s, when the “servant crisis” forced the mistress of the house to take on tasks servants had once performed, marketing efforts have suggested that increasing the range of products and amenities in our home will make housework easier and family life more pleasant. The scale of such products has only increased over time.In the 1920s, advertising suggested that middle-class women who had once had servants to do their more odious housework could now, with the right cleaners, be able to easily do the job themselves.By the 1950s, advertisements touted coordinated kitchens as allowing women to save time on their housework, so they could spend more time with their families. More recently, advertisers have presented the house itself as a product that will improve the family’s social standing while providing ample space for family activities and togetherness for the parent couple, all the while remaining easy to maintain. The implication has been that even if our houses get larger, we won’t need to spend more effort running them.In my research, I note that the housework shown — cooking, doing laundry, helping children with their homework — is presented as an opportunity for social engagement or family bonding.Advertisements never mentioned that more bathrooms also mean more toilets to scrub, or that having a large yard with a pool for the kids and their friends means hours of upkeep. RELATED ARTICLES The United States is facing a housing crisis: Affordable housing is inadequate, while luxury homes abound. Homelessness remains a persistent problem in many areas of the country.Despite this, popular culture has often focused on housing as an opportunity for upward mobility: the American Dream wrapped within four walls and a roof. The housing industry has contributed to this belief as it has promoted ideals of “living better.” Happiness is marketed as living with both more space and more amenities.As an architect and scholar who examines how we shape buildings and how they shape us, I’ve examined the trend toward “more is better” in housing. Opulent housing is promoted as a reward for hard work and diligence, turning housing from a basic necessity into an aspirational product.Yet what are the ethical consequences of such aspirational dreams? Is there a point where “more is better” creates an ethical dilemma? Redefining the paradigm“Living better” through purchasing bigger housing with more lavish amenities thus poses several ethical questions.In living in the United States, how willing should we be to accept a system in which relatively opulent lifestyles are achievable to the middle class only through low-wage labor by others? And how willing should we be to accept a system in which an increase in amenities purchased by the affluent foreshadows a reduction in those amenities for the financially less endowed?Ethically, I believe that the American Dream should not be allowed to devolve into a zero-sum game, in which one person’s gain comes at others’ loss. A solution could lie in redefining the ideal of “living better.” Instead of limiting access to space through its privatization, we could think of publicly accessible spaces and amenities as providing new freedoms though opportunities for engaging with people who are different from us and who might thus stretch our thinking about the world.Redefining the American Dream in this way would open us to new and serendipitous experiences, as we break through the walls that surround us. Alexandra Staub is an associate professor of architecture, affiliate faculty, Rock Ethics Institute, Pennsylvania State University. This post originally appeared at The Conversation.last_img read more

first_img The Board of Directors of the Urban Development Corporation (UDC) has appointed Ms Heather Pinnock, General Manager of the entity as of April 1, 2019.Ms Pinnock acted as General Manager from September 24, 2018 until the time of her appointment. Prior to that she served as Deputy General Manager, Planning Development and Project Management Division.According to Chairman Senator Ransford Braham, the Board extends its full support and good wishes to Ms. Pinnock as she embarks on this new journey, ‘the Board expects that the UDC will continue its transformative mission of making development happen by delivering mega-projects such as the Closed Harbour Beach Park in Montego Bay, for which ground was recently broken. The upgrading of Ocho Rios, master planning for the town of Port Royal, establishment of Jamaica’s Third City and the completion of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Foreign Trade Building’ and further build out of the downtown Kingston redevelopment including the construction of the Houses of Parliament are also high priority projects for the UDC.Ms Pinnock provides leadership for a team of almost 1000 professionals spanning disciplines of technical services, legal, finance, estate management, integrated marketing communication and environmental management. Her professional experience includes key public sector roles including Chief Technical Director at the then Ministry of Water and Housing, Senior Project Manager at the National Housing Trust and Consultant Senior Project Manager with the Government of Trinidad and Tobago’s Housing Development Corporation.Ms Pinnock has also garnered valuable experience working with the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) in Jamaica, the Institute for Sustainable Development, University of the West Indies, University of Technology (UTech) and the Kingston Restoration Company.Ms. Pinnock is a graduate of the University College London, where she completed a Master of Science degree in Development and Planning with a concentration in Building and Urban Design in Development. She also holds a Bachelor of Arts in Architectural Studies degree from the Caribbean School of Architecture at the University of Technology and a Postgraduate Certificate in Green Economy (Climate) from Technische Universität Dresden in Germany.She has been the recipient of many awards including that of being a Chevening Scholar and also serves as a Justice of the Peace in the parish of St. Andrew. Ms Pinnock is married to Julian Dadag and they have one son Sean.For further information, please contact:The Corporate Relations and Marketing DepartmentUrban Development Corporation12 Ocean BoulevardKingston, JamaicaTel: (876) 656-8031Email [email protected] Ms Pinnock acted as General Manager from September 24, 2018 until the time of her appointment. Prior to that she served as Deputy General Manager, Planning Development and Project Management Division. According to Chairman Senator Ransford Braham, the Board extends its full support and good wishes to Ms. Pinnock as she embarks on this new journey, ‘the Board expects that the UDC will continue its transformative mission of making development happen by delivering mega-projects such as the Closed Harbour Beach Park in Montego Bay, for which ground was recently broken. The upgrading of Ocho Rios, master planning for the town of Port Royal, establishment of Jamaica’s Third City and the completion of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Foreign Trade Building’ and further build out of the downtown Kingston redevelopment including the construction of the Houses of Parliament are also high priority projects for the UDC. The Board of Directors of the Urban Development Corporation (UDC) has appointed Ms Heather Pinnock, General Manager of the entity as of April 1, 2019. Story Highlightslast_img read more