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first_img RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR News Derry PSNI investigate alleged sectarian attack Police in Derry are appealing for information about a suspected sectarian assault at the weekend in which a man sustained facial injuries.The injured man believes there was a sectarian motivation to the incident at Foyle Street at about 2.30am on Saturday morning.He was walking towards the Foyle Street car park after a night out with a friend when they were approached a group of up to 10 males and an argument ensued. The man and his friend were chased to the car park and assaulted.The injured man, who is from the Waterside area, sustained a broken jaw and broken nose, as well as other facial and mouth injuries. Twitter Facebook By News Highland – May 19, 2014 Previous articleIrish Education and Cultural Tourism initiative launched in DowningsNext articleRNLI releases dramatic footage of fisherman’s rescue at Clonmany News Highland Main Evening News, Sport and Obituaries Tuesday May 25th Twitter Further drop in people receiving PUP in Donegal Pinterestcenter_img Pinterest Man arrested on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences in Derry WhatsApp Google+ Google+ 365 additional cases of Covid-19 in Republic Gardai continue to investigate Kilmacrennan fire WhatsApp 75 positive cases of Covid confirmed in North Facebooklast_img read more

first_img For Harvard hoops, an off-court education HSAC’s current leadership shares Puopolo’s commitment to moving the field forward. Current co-president Erik Johnsson, a junior concentrating in statistics and a member of the Crimson volleyball team, recently completed a project designed to improve upon the Elo model, a widely respected player skill-level rating system often employed by statistics heavyweight fivethirtyeight.com. When perusing fivethirtyeight while watching an NBA game, Johnsson noticed that the site had “huge percent chances” for then-underperforming teams the Utah Jazz and the New Orleans Pelicans to make the playoffs, which he thought to be “a little odd.” So Johnsson read up on the site’s model, replicated it, and, to make the model more exact, added in some new variables (in short, accounting for off-season changes in team strength by making adjustments in ratings for games earlier in the current season). His findings: Over a 10-year period, his model did make “slightly better” yet “statistically significant” predictions.By working with the Elo model, Johnsson followed in the footsteps of HSAC faculty adviser and senior lecturer on statistics Mark Glickman, whose Glicko Rating System was also developed as an improvement to the Elo model. Johnsson was also able to implement ideas from a Harvard statistics course in his analysis. This spirit of learning and then teaching, especially among members of the Collective, has always been a big part of what HSAC does.“We actively encourage members to ask us for help,” said the other current co-president, Jack Schroeder, a sophomore studying government and data science who is also on the curling team, “either with the methodology behind the project, the writing process, or even just getting the data, which is often the hardest part.”Faculty adviser Rader added that he is able to maintain a largely hands-off approach in his own role thanks to mentoring from the older members in the group, who have a wealth of institutional knowledge and a stronger understanding of potential methodologies than some of their younger counterparts. He said he only steps in when he sees an opportunity to push the students further by recommending more sophisticated models that they may not be familiar with yet. Hoping for an edge in this year’s March Madness office pool? Have a longstanding argument with your friends on which team’s fans are the most loyal? Always wondered how much of a difference it makes to be able to throw the last stone in the initial curling end? You can find your answers in the work of the Harvard Sports Analysis Collective (HSAC), a student-run organization dedicated to the quantitative analysis of sports strategy and management.Since its founding in 2006 under the tutelage of “Moneyball”-cited statistician and Professor Emeritus Carl Morris, HSAC has been answering a variety of sports-related questions, employing often-sophisticated statistical models to get to the bottom of longstanding debates or offer context to those eye-popping and head-scratching numbers that excite, and boggle the minds of, sports fanatics and pundits all over the world. (The collective just posted its analysis of this year’s March Madness college basketball tournament.)HSAC member projects, which range from social media posts drawn from simple fact-finding exercises to senior theses engaging complex quantitative analysis, reflect what’s current and relevant in the sports world, and they often emerge from spirited conversation during Collective meetings, which take place Tuesday nights in Winthrop House. According to HSAC faculty adviser and senior preceptor in statistics Kevin Rader, popular methodologies compare two groups (teams, leagues, player pools) or look at how things have changed over time. “Or a really extreme event happens,” he explains, “something cool happens in the Super Bowl, and a decision needed to be made. Was it the right decision? Let’s investigate that from an empirical perspective.”This past January, HSAC took to Twitter to answer a simple question many college football fans were likely pondering during Clemson’s surprising national championship drubbing of Alabama, 44–16, namely: When was the last time the Crimson Tide gave up more than 50 points in a regulation game? The answer, according to HSAC: When they lost to Sewanee 54­–4 way back in 1907. The tweet received close to 250 retweets and nearly 500 likes.,When the HSAC team looks to delve deeper into a question and really engage their skills as statisticians, they’ll write about their findings on the blog, which has drawn coverage from significant mainstream media outlets like ESPN, NBC Sports, Bleacher Report, the Boston Globe, and The New Yorker, as well as major league franchises and the leagues themselves, including the NBA’s Dallas Mavericks, Memphis Grizzlies, and Orlando Magic, the National Football League, and Major League Soccer. Some popular posts over the years: “A Way-Too-Early Prediction of the NFL Season,” “Conference Bias in College Football,” and “Which Sports League Has the Most Parity?”Often, existing fan theories (“that referee hates my team” or “we never win in that stadium”) inspire HSAC members to challenge their veracity. Last February, HSAC President Emeritus Andrew Puopolo, a senior at the College and a self-professed soccer addict, sought to answer the age-old question of referee bias using the oft-maligned English soccer official Mike Dean, who is particularly reviled by supporters of the London-based Arsenal Football Club, as an entrée into a statistical analysis of referee/team-specific bias throughout the English Premier League. In short, Puopolo looked at every combination of Premier League teams and referees who managed at least 15 of their matches between the 2005–2006 and 2016–2017 seasons, comparing actual results against pregame betting odds in his quest to find bias — of which, in the end, he found “no alarming signs.” Not that an Arsenal supporter would ever be swayed by the data, even if it was culled from tens of thousands of combinations.Which is fine by Puopolo, who is the first to admit when he finds flaws in his own methodologies, and who loves the opportunity to spark conversation — on sports, but especially on statistics — in a quest to help himself and his colleagues get better. Often, HSAC analyses encourage readers to make their own decisions about the data; there isn’t always a clear-cut answer to every question. This spirit of engagement in finding new ways to look at data is what HSAC is all about. Often, existing fan theories (“that referee hates my team” or “we never win in that stadium”) inspire HSAC members to challenge their veracity. On a Southern swing, men’s basketball team meets former President Carter and visits Martin Luther King Jr.’s church and gravesite Quidditch, anyone? Inside Harvard club sports Johnsson, Schroeder, and Puopolo all foresee potential future careers in sports analytics, aspiring to follow in the footsteps of HSAC alumni such as Alec Halaby ’09, vice president of football operations and strategy for the Philadelphia Eagles; Daniel Adler ’10, HLS/HBS ’17, director of baseball operations for the Minnesota Twins; and recent grad Nathán Goldberg Crenier ’18, who is already assistant to the president of the U.S. Soccer Federation. And opportunities may arise in fields outside of traditional sports venues, said Puopolo. As more and more states seek to legalize sports gambling, there will be new opportunities for machine-learning- and data-science-minded graduates to pursue careers in that field as well.The pipeline is real, and the connections to the professional major sports are active. Last semester, Puopolo set up consulting projects with teams from the National Football League and Major League Baseball, which are ongoing.“[These projects] give everyone a chance to take these skills that we talk about during meetings, and stuff people are learning at school in an academic setting,” said Schroeder, “and really apply it in a professional, business setting.”“We see this as a great way to increase membership in the club, too,” added Johnsson. “If we can convince freshmen and sophomores who like sports and statistics to come to the club, and who can then gain actual experience working for real teams, and say they have connections with [major professional sports teams], it’s a great way to get people involved and excited.” Related Snapshots of student athletes in motion The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news.last_img read more

first_imgPennsylvania State Agencies Supporting Fayette County Responders, Residents Press Release Harrisburg, PA – Governor Tom Wolf today thanked state workers helping Fayette County responders and residents meet the challenges that resulted from serious flooding primarily in Connellsville City, Connellsville Township, and Bullskin Township. Pennsylvania Emergency Management (PEMA) Director Richard D. Flinn Jr. yesterday traveled to Connellsville and began meeting with state and local agencies, community organizations and residents in order to assess the damage and any needs for state resources.“Director Flinn and his team are on the ground working to ensure we are doing all we can to help residents, local agencies and these communities recover from flooding and related damage,” Governor Wolf said. “We thank the people of Fayette County for their strong community support for one another and the many local officials working tirelessly to keep people safe.”PEMA has been on the ground working with the Fayette County Emergency Management Agency, led by County Emergency Management Director Roy Shipley, since Monday morning. PEMA and Fayette County have conducted preliminary damage assessments to determine the impact of the flooding and determine eligibility for a possible U.S. Small Business Administration disaster declaration. The SBA declaration would make low-interest loans available to eligible homeowners, renters and business owners.“We will continue to monitor the situation and the commonwealth stands ready to supply resources as requested by local responders,” Director Flinn said. “I have seen firsthand how the leaders and residents here in Fayette County are working together to respond and recover from this unfortunate act of Mother Nature, and we are proud to be here to assist them.”PEMA is currently coordinating with state agencies, including the Departments of Transportation, Environmental Protection, and Health, to assess the need for additional resources, including road and bridge repair, emergency permits and health and safety supplies.Multiple volunteer organizations are coordinating disaster relief service. The Red Cross has established hotline number for residents at 724-438-2567. Connellsville Community Ministries are collecting donations to support citizens that have been affected by flooding.Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolf August 30, 2016center_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

first_imgORIN Boston’s 6 emerged winners of the Frederick Halley feature dominoes tournament held on Monday night last at Everest Cricket Club pavilion, Camp Road, Georgetown.In a fiercely contested encounter which went right down to the wire, Boston’s 6 tallied 79 games to edge out Beharry’s 6 on 77 and Halley’s 6 which ended in cellar position on 74.The game wasn’t decided until the final sitting after only one game separated the three teams, both Beharry Halley’s teams deadlocked on 63 and Boston’s 6 a mere one game away on 62.In the end, Boston’s 6 prevailed after marking 17 games in the final sitting which saw Beharry’s 6 scoring 14 and Halley’s 6 managing 12 games.Sonia Goodluck led the way for Boston’s with 17 games while John Freeman supported with 15. Skipper Boston, who played through, made 13 in his first three sittings and 14 in the other three.The top players in Beharry’s 6 were Roderick Harry with 15 games and Mark Welch who marked 14.For Halley’s 6, Edmund Sammy topped with 15 games while there were 14 and 13 games respectively for Ravi Shivnauth and Frederick Halley.The game was organised by Manniram “Packer” Shew while the trophies were sponsored by Halley.last_img read more

first_imgSources tell us Charter gets by with continuing to write off these annual financial losses on its balance sheets through some terrific tax laws in place. The Dodgers not only go full spigot in this revenue stream, but whatever ways they’ve manipulated attendance figures and ticket income make it look as if they’ve created a situation where coming out to the ballpark is a special, added value, like having to pay for another live performance of “Hamilton.”And the third part of this – no cooperation from AT&T’s DirecTV – holds fast as well. The math bears it out. In what they call an “enterprise evaluation,” DirecTV would have had to lose about 20,000 subscribers over this situation before it even considered adding SportsNet LA to its menu, the $5 per subscriber price tag as the basis for computation. They’re barely a fourth of the way to that threshold. Never mind that the asinine TV commercials continue with a group of actors dressed as monsters propping up the simplistic message: “Satellite TV Bad. Spectrum Good.”Five years in, we seem to giving life to the metaphor of the boiling frog – the Dodgers and Spectrum have managed to kill us through a progressively low source of heat. They’ve taken the hopping anger out of most of us.Even so, the narrative feels as if it’s about to pivot to a much longer-term and darker reality for all who stand to prosper.THE ADJUSTMENT PERIOD More than half, and as much as 70 percent, of Southern Californian homes can’t access SportsNet LA, according to the generally accepted rhetoric. The hairs are split over whether or not those who have a choice to drop DirecTV and get Spectrum aren’t doing so because of the perceived inconvenience it may cause them.Whatever the number, the reality is that those slotted as Seniors and Baby Boomers still face the most anxiety over all this. Pair that up with the fact that the average age of a TV baseball viewer skews into the upper 50-year-old range.In an enlightening new book by Susan Jacoby called “Why Baseball Matters” (Yale University Books), the author wonders why the graying of the fan base is something those who run the game “refuse to talk about on the record.” Instead, they fidget spin their way around pitch clocks and counting trips to the mound as a way to tighten up the length of the games because they figure that’s what younger viewers may want.Our digital-age natives, ranging from newborns to those in the mid-30s, have conflicted motivation to invest time in watching a full game play out on TV.“Any baseball game is a process, not a series of disjointed, disconnected events,” Jacoby writes. “The digital world is not about process but about instant delivery of results, so it is logical that younger viewers find it more difficult to focus on baseball.”Those among the emerging Generation Cord Cutters are also more likely to resourcefully circumvent traditional means of obtaining a SportsNet LA service. You may know your cable bill includes a sneaky “sports surcharge” now up to $11.55 that tries to offset the increasing costs of channels weighted down by absorbing sports rights fees. They likely have never even seen a cable bill.Hardwired into manipulating delivery through an Xbox or Slingbox, seeking out a Facebook friend with a bootleg feed, or working around the MLB.tv servers with fake IDs, this demographic not-on-deck any more doesn’t bother with “demanding their providers know” they can’t otherwise get SNLA. They figure it out in other ways, then give the blueprint to the generation coming after them. Or, unable to endure the length of a game no matter how it’s unrestricted, they have passed on the secret of just tuning into the MLB Network each night to get a few live cut-ins from Dodger Stadium. They can then DVR the extended highlight packages during “Quick Pitch” programming to skim through it the next morning.All that said, these savvy media consumers of the Dodgers aren’t beholden to the other traditional platform – the radio. If they weren’t compelled to catch the last three years of Vin Scully’s three-inning simulcast, they have even less incentive for them to endure someone like Charley Steiner chortling on and on about how games are just too long these days. It only does a disservice to the listeners just trying to find a happy medium.THE SILENT MINORITYMore bothersome to us since the SNLA launch in 2013 is how the stalemate leaves out those who are living on the edges financially.Decades ago, the Dodgers’ TV coverage was limited to a KTTV-Channel 11 road Sunday game as well as all the contests played in San Francisco. It was reasonably proportional to how much national baseball was also available at the time.When regional sports nets exploded from the 1980s through 2010, the Dodgers still made sure there were at least a few dozen games set aside for over-the-air distribution, in addition to what cable offered. It was the beginning of the process of separating the haves from the have-nots.The Guggenheim group’s purchase of the Dodgers came with the expectation that launching their own media company and creating a team-owned channel would pave the road to the future with consumers’ sub fees. Chairman Mark Walters said at the time that SportsNet LA was a way to “provide substantial financial resources over the coming years.”In subsequent years of public shaming, private ambivalence and all other kinds of agitated media verbiage – including a U.S. Justice Department charge of collusion in late 2016 that was “settled” without any benefit to the consumer early in 2017 – the narrative never really included how to satisfy all those loyal Dodgers fans living in marginalized areas with roof-top antennas. The families that struggle each month to pay utility bills consider cable a luxury, but they keep the TV set with the rabbit ears to pick up whatever they can.So we circle back to that press release from February – five KTLA games, all in April, and probably nothing else unless you can pick up an ESPN, Fox Sports, FS1 or TBS feed somehow. A Facebook Watch deal has also been struck this year, 25 games that will be exclusive to the social media site and not available on traditional TV.The KTLA games aren’t because the Dodgers and Spectrum think this is a way to appease the masses or water down their own guilt. They have no other genuine answer to how to fix things. They’ll continue to assume the worse.ESPN has a national broadcast of the Dodgers-Giants season opener Thursday afternoon (4 p.m.) as well as the series ender Sunday evening (5 p.m.). In the course of the 162-game regular season, about 130-odd games will be just for SportsNet LA customers.For those who can access it. For those who know the drill.For those who still care. Year 5 of the Dodgers’ SportsNet LA Hostage Crisis is upon us. Continue to divest at your own risk.There is no news about additional distribution in the days before the 2018 MLB season is to begin. When the team and partner in crime Charter Communications released a statement a month ago about the latest feeble attempt to farm out five games in April to KTLA-Channel 5, it tried to bury the line about how “other distributors are not expected to carry SportsNet LA this season.”Both Spectrum, the Charter re-brand of the Time Warner original enabler, and the Dodgers, coming off a World Series appearance and winners of four straight NL West titles since the launch of the channel, would prefer you did not see either of them operating from a position of weakness at this stage of their 25-year, $8.3 billion agreement.In a bizarro way, both seem to be doing just fine with everything. MEASURING MEDIA MAYHEMWHAT SMOKES== After all those years of pitching Farmer John products, Vin Scully seems to be relishing his new role as a spokesman for Kingsford Charcoal in a new commercial spot. It opens with him finishing a conversation with the “commissioner” and exclaiming: “Hot dog! Opening Day is back! Go out and tell it to the world, guys!”== How much more a business man has former Laker Shaquille O’Neal become after his NBA playing days ended? How much of a force has Yorba Linda’s John Force become in the drag racing world? They are two of the four focus stories on the 252nd edition of HBO’s “Real Sports With Bryant Gumbel” that debuts Tuesday at 10:30 p.m.WHAT CHOKES== Fox reports an average of 4.03 million viewers from last Sunday’s NASCAR Cup Race at Auto Club Speedway in Fontana — well below the same race’s 5.19 million last year, 6.81 million two years ago and about half of the 8 million who watched in 2013. 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