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first_imgMathiba Molefe Children are set to parade the streets of Yeoville in celebration of Africa’s legacy at the Gauteng Children’s Carnival.(Image: Play Your Part)MEDIA CONTACTS • Mpolokeng M. MoloiPublic Relations OfficerGauteng Department of Sport, Arts, Culture and Recreation+27 11 355 2623+27 83 554 1974RELATED ARTICLES• Educated children help the nation grow• Nurturing the children• Putting children’s rights first• Teaching children to love themselvesThe start of spring after a long, cold winter will be marked with a celebratory carnival, which will also reference the vibrant history and culture of South Africa. Schoolchildren from across the province will participate in the third annual Gauteng Children’s Carnival through Yeoville on Saturday, 7 September.In all, 90 schools are participating. The carnival will be centred at Yeoville Boys Primary School, but the children will put their creative skills on show in a parade through the suburb’s streets in costumes of their own making. The Children’s Carnival is part of the build-up to the Road to Gauteng Carnival, scheduled for December. It will expose not only South African arts and various cultures, but those from around the continent. In this way, it will help to end xenophobia by exposing the youth to other people.It aims to enforce the feeling that Africa is one community, and to help African nationals hailing from all corners of the continent integrate into local spaces. It will also spread unity among the diverse groups of young people.Yeoville was previously known for its energy and artistry, all of which will be brought back to life by the children and their colourful, extravagant costumes. The theme is “Celebrating Africa’s Legacy”. Given that Yeoville has such a large African community, the carnival organisers identified it as the perfect venue to make as big an impact as possible.Organisers hope it will help to strengthen social cohesion and return the suburb to its former splendour. Another aim is to highlight the importance of education and to use this day of fun and games to encourage participating children to pursue their dreams of one day becoming world-class professionals in the fields of their choice.Festivities will begin at 10am and end at 4pm, starting with a 2.3km walk, the route of which will be painted in bright colours. Among those who will attend are Trevor Fowler, the Joburg city manager, and Boy Ngobeni, the head of the Gauteng department of education, as well as representatives from SA Breweries, which is working alongside the National Youth Development Agency and the Department of Trade and Industry on the You Decide campaign.You Decide is aimed at educating the youth and building awareness about the dangers of alcohol consumption and abuse at a young age.About the carnival, Lebogang Maile, the MEC of sport, arts, culture and recreation, says: “The Gauteng Children’s Carnival is more than fun and more than showcasing talent; it is also a means to urge youth’s interest in education using the arts. It is about telling the youth to remain in school while pursuing their talent or ambition, especially within the entertainment industry. It is also about celebrating Africa’s heritage and creativity. The learners don’t only participate on the day but get involved in the creation of the costumes, music and dance.”The interest from local leaders such as the area’s ward councillor, Sihlwele Myeki, has led to an additional number of children from Yeoville and surrounding areas being allowed to join in on the action this weekend. Music will be provided on the parade by DJs performing on flatbed trucks. They are the finalists of the 2012 Gauteng Carnival DJ programme, held to unearth musical talent.Children will also be involved in the hip-hop programme at Yeoville Boys Primary School, in which they will compete in activities such as such as emceeing, poetry, graffiti and dance. It will take place after the parade, and marks the end of the Dance to your Rhythm project aimed at high school pupils who have a passion for all things hip-hop.last_img read more

first_imgDon’t miss out on the latest news and information. Heart Evangelista admits she’s pregnant… with chicken Flashing a balanced offensive, San Beda turned back Jose Rizal U, 80-66, in the other semifinal match.Pint-sized playmaker Aljun Melecio exploded for 30 points, while Ricci Rivero and Ben Mbala combined for 51 for the Archers. “This is a good game for us, because we learned a lot with having composure with our decision making,” said La Salle coach Aldin Ayo.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout What ‘missteps’? MOST READ World’s 50 Best Restaurants launches new drinking and dining guide View comments Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ End of Pacquiao reign is here, Horn claims 1 dead in Cavite blast, fire Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ Newcomer Santi Santillan completed a three-point play with 10 seconds remaining to lift UAAP champion La Salle to a thrilling 100-99 victory over Lyceum and forge a title duel with San Beda in the Filoil Flying V Premier Cup.A recruit from University of the Visayas, who is set to make his debut in the UAAP this season, Santillan was at the right place at the right time, capping a wild sequence with a lay-up while drawing a foul as the Green Archers survived a gutsy stand by the Pirates, who nearly completed a comeback from 12 points down in the final period at Filoil Flying V Centre in San Juan.ADVERTISEMENT WATCH: Firefighters rescue baby seal found in parking garage Cayetano to unmask people behind ‘smear campaign’ vs him, SEA Games LATEST STORIES Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Nextlast_img read more

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first_imgOTTAWA – Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is proposing to levy a federal excise tax on recreational marijuana once it becomes legal next July, with the provinces and territories receiving half the revenue.Under a federal proposal put to premiers during a first ministers meeting Tuesday, each gram of pot would be subject to an excise tax of $1 on sales up to $10 and a 10 per cent tax on sales of more than $10.However, premiers argued that provinces will foot the lion’s share of the cost of regulating and enforcing the new regime and should, therefore, get the lion’s share of the revenue.Trudeau said the level of taxation on marijuana and revenue sharing are still matters under negotiation with the provinces. He acknowledged that there will be “significant new costs” associated with legalizing pot and said he’s open to provincial arguments that they’ll bear the brunt of them.Still, he emphasized that the goal of legalization is not to make money.“Our goal from the very beginning on the legalization and regulation of marijuana was not to make profits, to bring in tax revenue,” Trudeau told a wrap-up news conference following a day-long meeting with provincial and territorial leaders.Rather, he said, “all first ministers are fully aligned” on the goal of keeping marijuana out of the hands of kids and out of the control of criminal gangs.Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne said it’s not simply a matter of sharing any federal tax revenue with provinces. She noted that a number of municipalities have told her they will face some new costs as well.Any taxes imposed on marijuana will have to be sufficiently low to keep the price low enough to force the black market out of business, said Nova Scotia Premier Stephen McNeil.Consequently, he said: “I don’t think we should run out and start spending tax dollars based on cannabis.”No one should think legalization means governments will “hit the mother lode,” agreed Quebec Premier Philippe Couillard.He argued that pricing of marijuana will be a balancing act: if it’s priced too low it will encourage use; if it’s priced too high, it will keep the black market thriving.Manitoba Premier Brian Pallister, who wants the federal government to give the provinces another year to introduce regulatory and enforcement regimes, said discussion of revenue sharing is premature.“It reminds me a little bit of the two salesman who were having a vicious argument about a commission split on a deal that they hadn’t done yet,” he said.“We don’t really know what the ramifications are of this. This is a historic change … We’re talking about splitting revenue at this point we don’t know what the net may be. We may be splitting a cost, not a net proceed. We don’t know.”Legalization of marijuana was one of two issues that was top of mind for premiers as they arrived for the day-long summit with Trudeau. The other was the federal government’s proposed changes to small business tax measures.Federal Finance Minister Bill Morneau briefed the premiers on his proposed changes, which he maintains are aimed at ensuring the wealthiest Canadians can’t use incorporation of small businesses to avoid paying their fair share of taxes.The proposals include prohibiting income sprinkling to family members who do no work for the business, limiting the ability to make passive investments in things unrelated to the business and restricting the ability to convert income to capital gains, which is taxed at a lower rate.The proposals have been slammed by large and small business groups, doctors, accountants, lawyers, farmers, shop owners and even some of Trudeau’s Liberal backbenchers. A number of premiers have expressed concern that they could prevent farmers from passing on their family farms to their children and that they could cause doctors, particularly in rural areas, to pack up and leave.McNeil said he was somewhat reassured by Morneau’s presentation.“I was certainly pleased to hear the finance minister say today that his tax policy would not impact family businesses, farms being transferred from one generation to the next, he wanted to ensure that women were being successful as entrepreneurs with … the capacity to save for maternity leave and that all Canadians need the flexibility when it comes to retirement,” he said.Consultations on the proposed change ended Monday. Trudeau emphasized that the government has heard the concerns of small business people and the premiers and that they’ll be taken into account in the final proposals.Trudeau and the premiers sat down for about 90 minutes Tuesday morning with Indigenous leaders. While they were generally pleased to have an opportunity to air their particular concerns, the Indigenous leaders said they’ll continue to push for full inclusion in first ministers’ summits.“There are still these historical barriers for Indigenous inclusion within multilateral conversations in this country,” said Natan Obed, of the Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, adding that sometimes provincial and territorial governments “don’t want to give up power” to Indigenous Peoples.Isadore Day, Ontario regional chief for the Assembly of First Nations, dismissed the first ministers’ summit as “nothing but just words.”“We were shuffled out of the room again.”When the issue of Aboriginal self-government came up during the meeting, Day said Couillard warned that his province’s long-standing constitutional demands must be dealt with first.“He pulled the constitutional card,” Day said, accusing Couillard of holding First Nations in Quebec “hostage.”Perry Bellegarde, national chief of the Assembly of First Nations, said he’ll continue pushing for more first ministers meetings with Indigenous leaders. In the meantime, he said he advised premiers Tuesday that “if you want to grow Canada’s economy … you have to involve First Nations people every step of the way.”Investing in the untapped potential of young Indigenous people is critical to addressing Canada’s skilled labour shortage and aging population and respecting Aboriginal jurisdiction over their land is crucial to the development of natural resources, he said.last_img read more

first_imgEDMONTON – Alberta Premier Rachel Notley says she will go up against controversial anti-pipeline activist Tzeporah Berman in duelling speeches next month.Notley says she needs to go, in her words, “to counter misinformation and ensure that the whole story is told.”Notley and Berman will not go head to head but will speak at different times on Oct. 13 at an Alberta Teachers’ Association convention near Edmonton.Berman has been an outspoken critic of the oilsands and the oil and gas sector, and became a political lightning rod after joining a provincial oilsands advisory group early in Notley’s mandate.Berman has not been on that committee for over a year, but the opposition United Conservatives continue to remind Albertans of her involvement and the symbolism of anti-energy activists helping steer government policy.Notley, heading into an election next spring, dismissed suggestions that the speeches have a political dimension, and says she doesn’t view Berman as a political albatross that her NDP must find a way to shrug off.last_img read more