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first_imgHere’s something you don’t hear much anymore.Penton Media’s John Teresko, a senior technology editor at IndustryWeek, Monday celebrated 50 years with the company—and with the magazine. That’s 50 years—as in five decades.“What made it a sustainable journey is that the quality of my associates kept increasing,” Teresko told me yesterday.  “They made it a rewarding and enjoyable journey.” Teresko started at the magazine when it was still called Steel, The Metalworking Management Weekly. The magazine changed its name to IndustryWeek in 1970.Staying with one business, let alone one product for 50 years is a rare accomplishment in today’s increasingly schizophrenic, layoff-prone (not to mention e-media obsessed) publishing world.last_img read more

STATE REP RACE Buckley Receives Endorsements From State Reps Will Crocker Kevin Kuros

first_imgTEWKSBURY, MA — Erin Buckley (R-Tewksbury) recently announced endorsements from two state representatives.“Having Erin as my Legislative Aide helped my office serve the 2nd Barnstable with the focus and care I campaigned on. Electing Erin Buckley as the State Representative for the 19th Middlesex would be the best choice the communities of Tewksbury and Wilmington could possibly make,” said Representative Will Crocker (R – 2nd Barnstable). “Her experience is unmatched and her dedication second-to-none. I look forward to serving with Erin on Beacon Hill.”“I’ve known Erin for several years through her work as Representative Crocker’s Legislative Aide. She understands the way Beacon Hill works, is great at constituent services, knows many of the key players, and would be a great addition to our caucus,” announced Representative Kevin Kuros (R – 8th Worcester).Buckley resigned her position as Finance Director for the Rick Green for Congress campaign, in order to campaign in Tewksbury and Wilmington full-time.Prior to her position as Finance Director, Erin served as Legislative Aide to Representative Will Crocker (2nd Barnstable), who himself scored a powerful Republican victory in 2016. In her position as Aide on Beacon Hill, Erin learned the challenging in-and-outs of State House politics but also learned of her passion for constituent work. It is that passion for helping those in need traverse through the unfortunate bureaucracy on Beacon Hill that has driven Erin to seek election as State Representative.(NOTE: The above press release is from the Erin Buckley campaign.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedSTATE REP RACE: Tewksbury Republican Erin Buckley Launches CampaignIn “Government”STATE REP RACE: Billerica State Rep. Marc Lombardo Endorses PrinzivalliIn “Government”STATE REP RACE Q&A: Erin Buckley Discusses State Rep Pay, Environmental IssuesIn “Government”last_img read more

New survey suggests far fewer Jupiter sized rogue planets than thought

first_img Explore further Back in 2011, an international team of researchers conducted a study of rogue planets and reported evidence suggesting that there are approximately twice as many rogue Jupiters as main sequence stars. In this new effort, the researchers took a new census gain a more accurate estimate.Identifying rogue planets is difficult, of course, because they do not emit any light of their own—against the black of space, there is nothing to see. But when they move past light emitted from a distant star, a lensing phenomenon can occur. This happens when light from the blocked star is magnified by the planet’s gravity, causing a lensing halo effect that can be seen by instruments here on Earth. The size of the planet can also be calculated by noting the lensing duration. The researchers with this new census winnowed down the millions of stars in the dataset to just 2,617 high-quality microlensing events. This represented a much larger sample size than the one used by the team in 2011—they analyzed just 474 events.The researchers conclude that Jupiter-sized rogue planets are far rarer than the earlier census claimed. But they note it is possible that are more Earth-sized rogue planets roaming around than currently believed. The data also showed that of the big rogue planets roaming the Milky Way, approximately 25 percent of them are likely gas giants, with the remaining 75 percent represented by rocky or ice giants. Citation: New survey suggests far fewer Jupiter sized rogue planets than thought (2017, July 25) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-07-survey-jupiter-sized-rogue-planets.html An artist’s impression of a gravitational microlensing event by a free-floating planet. Credit: J. Skowron / Warsaw University Observatory © 2017 Phys.org Simulations suggest Planet Nine may have been a rogue More information: Przemek Mróz et al. No large population of unbound or wide-orbit Jupiter-mass planets, Nature (2017). DOI: 10.1038/nature23276Planet formation theories predict that some planets may be ejected from their parent systems as result of dynamical interactions and other processes. Unbound planets can also be formed through gravitational collapse, in a way similar to that in which stars form. A handful of free-floating planetary-mass objects have been discovered by infrared surveys of young stellar clusters and star-forming regions as well as wide-field surveys, but these studies are incomplete for objects below five Jupiter masses. Gravitational microlensing is the only method capable of exploring the entire population of free-floating planets down to Mars-mass objects, because the microlensing signal does not depend on the brightness of the lensing object. A characteristic timescale of microlensing events depends on the mass of the lens: the less massive the lens, the shorter the microlensing event. A previous analysis of 474 microlensing events found an excess of ten very short events (1–2 days)—more than known stellar populations would suggest—indicating the existence of a large population of unbound or wide-orbit Jupiter-mass planets (reported to be almost twice as common as main-sequence stars). These results, however, do not match predictions of planet-formation theories and surveys of young clusters. Here we analyse a sample of microlensing events six times larger than that of ref. 11 discovered during the years 2010–15. Although our survey has very high sensitivity (detection efficiency) to short-timescale (1–2 days) microlensing events, we found no excess of events with timescales in this range, with a 95 per cent upper limit on the frequency of Jupiter-mass free-floating or wide-orbit planets of 0.25 planets per main-sequence star. We detected a few possible ultrashort-timescale events (with timescales of less than half a day), which may indicate the existence of Earth-mass and super-Earth-mass free-floating planets, as predicted by planet-formation theories. Journal information: Nature (Phys.org)—A team of researchers with Warsaw University Observatory, Ohio State University and the University of Warwick has found evidence that suggests there are far fewer Jupiter-sized rogue planets roaming the Milky Way galaxy than prior surveys have shown. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes using data compiled from the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment to analyze light curves of approximately 50 million stars for the period 2010 to 2015 and what they found by doing so. The gravity of a free-floating planet may deflect and focus light from a distant source star when passing closely in front of it. Owing to the distorted image the star temporarily seems much brighter. Credit: J. Skowron / Warsaw University Observatory The researchers conclude by suggesting their findings jibe with logic—there are likely to be fewer rogue giant planets because they would have a stronger gravitational connection to their original star system. Smaller, Earth-like planets, on the other hand, could be flung off with relative ease. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

first_img Register Now » 4 min read This story originally appeared on PCMag January 15, 2018 This promises to be a year of confusion in the tech world. Less than two weeks in, and we’re already mired in this chip flaw madness, while the continued rise in Bitcoin and other crypto-currencies is concerning. What’s a sure thing? Driverless cars? Quantum computing? Nobody knows.I could go down the list, but I’m feeling a little déjà vu. In the late ’90s, those who questioned a stupid idea or trend were immediately told they did not “get it.” We were in a “new economy” where everything had changed, after all.What didn’t change was an economic collapse when reality set in. Having dog food shipped to your house by Pets.com was not viable as a business model. It folded.How is that different from what Amazon is doing today with Amazon Prime? You join Amazon Prime for $99 a year and get all sorts of free benefits including video streaming of movies and free two-day shipping of everything imaginable. Only creative bookkeeping makes it work. Hello 1999. I won’t even bother with the Webvan parallels.Then there is the mania over driverless cars. According to one observer at CES, if you weren’t there with some driverless car technology, you might as well have stood in the corner.Driverless cars will only work in a crime-free, vandal-free world. Don’t kid yourself, these devices have decades to go. It’s not because of the car tech. It’s because computers are still stupid and can easily be fooled when placed in the real world to navigate and interact on their own.Onward to the most dubious of all technologies: quantum computing. Nobody can ever explain it in a way that doesn’t make you draw back your head and flash a sour look on your face. I have listened to the theoretical angles about this so-called technology and, afterwards, felt I was just in a game of three-card monte.I spent a long time talking to one of the most knowledgeable reporters who has covered the technology from the outset and he still doesn’t know what to make of it and whether the inventors are sincere, deluded or just full of it. It’s impossible to tell. Yet, Intel and others are jumping on board “just in case.”Perhaps the most amazing hoax ever perpetrated since Piltdown man is Bitcoin, all the other cryptocurrencies and the blockchain hoo-hah.We were all fools not to buy it when one bitcoin was 50 cents. That much I will agree on. But would we be holding on forever? Who knows? For years I have equated Bitcoin with the Beanie Babies phenomenon; its collapse foretold the dot-com collapse. At least a Beanie Baby had an intrinsic worth, that of a small plaything for kids. Bitcoin has removed anything intrinsic. All it has is perceived value. You cannot play with a Bitcoin, you cannot melt them down, you cannot use them as a toy or art. They are magic dust.But mention this to a Bitcoin fanatic, and I’m told I “don’t get it.” Hello, 1999.I’ve heard there is a Bitcoin vending machine someplace, but I cannot imagine what a hassle it would be to use. It’s nuts. But through the mechanism of mass hysteria, they are worth a fortune and going higher in value.How long can this go on? If the scene has locked on to the late 1990’s groove of insanity, it’s possible that we are in an analog of 1998 and can maybe make it through the year without a collapse. But looking at the start of the year, I doubt it. Smoke, meet mirror. Attend this free webinar and learn how you can maximize efficiency while getting the most critical things done right. Free Webinar | Sept 5: Tips and Tools for Making Progress Toward Important Goalslast_img read more