At a Glance Kingston KC2000 1TB SSD Review

first_imgAt a Glance: Kingston KC2000 1TB SSD Review The Surprising Reason Why Brandon Routh Is Returning to Superman Facebook Twitter Linkedin Pinterest Google Plus Reddit Hacker News Flipboard Email Copy 0shares This site may earn affiliate commissions from the links on this page. Terms of use. Lilly From ‘Princess Diaries’ Is 36 Now and Gorgeous Tagged In SSDsreviewsat a glancekingston Post a Comment 3 Comments Kingston’s new KC2000 series SSDs were designed to tackle the high-end consumer SSD market. With capacities available up to 2TB in size and read/write speeds as high as 3,200/2,200MB/s, this drive has the potential to play a major role in the SSD market. But so far, the drives are off to a rough start.DesignKingston’s KC2000 SSDs use 96-layer 3D TLC Kingston NAND that connects to an SMI 2262EN controller. This controller features Silicon Motion’s NANDXtend ECC technology, which helps to keep data secure by preventing read/write errors. The drive also supports 256-bit XTS-AES encryption. These features make the drive better suited for business use, where the loss or theft of data could have serious consequences.These drives have average endurance ratings that match up with what we’ve seen from other 3D TLC NAND products in the past. In short, for each 250GB of NAND, the drive is able to handle 150TBW before failing.BenchmarksOur sister site PCMag ran a 1TB model of Kingston’s KC2000 through its usual quartet of benchmarks alongside three competing products from Adata, Samsung, and Western Digital. In the first test using PCMark 8 Storage test, we see virtually no difference from one drive to the next.Stepping things up with Crystal DiskMark 6.0 we start to see some deviation between the competing drives. In the sequential read/write test, Kingston’s KC2000 places second while reading data and last while writing it. It’s worth noting that the KC2000 actually exceeds its maximum reported read/write performance. The same can’t be said for the other tested drives, all of which come in below their rated performance.Reading and writing random 4K chunks of data is a weakness of this drive. It doesn’t come in dead last in this test, but its performance results leave much to be desired.Turning last to AS-SSD’s file transfer test, we once again see the KC2000 in a rather mixed position. The KC2000 came finished in second place while transferring the program folder and the game folder, and its performance results were close to what was achieved by the Adata XPG SX8200. Conversely, the drive’s performance while transferring the ISO file was significantly lower than the other tested drives.ConclusionFinally, there’s pricing. The 1TB model PCMag tested has an MSRP of $201.50, and strangely, it’s currently available for a higher price of $218.06 from Amazon. Unfortunately for Kingston, SSD prices have been trending downward, so that’s somewhat high for a 1TB SSD at the moment.The 1TB model of Samsung’s 970 Evo is similarly priced but offers better performance in most scenarios. The Adata XPG SX8200 Pro 1TB is significantly less expensive at $134.99, and it also supports ECC technology.Now read:At a Glance: Adata XPG SX6000 Pro ReviewAt a Glance: Acer Nitro XV3 XV273K ReviewAt a Glance: Dell UltraSharp U3219Q Review ‘Far From Home’ Brought Back An Old Character No One Noticed 3 Comments You Might Also LikePowered By ZergNet By Michael Sexton on July 18, 2019 at 2:29 pm Tom Hanks Breaks The Internet With Mister Rogers Debut ‘It: Chapter 2’ Director Says He’d Love To Remake This Movie The Real Reason Emma Watson Refuses to Do a Nude Scene ‘Black Widow’ Set Photos Reveal The Main Villain Dani From ‘Girl Next Door’ is Absolutely Gorgeous Now at 36last_img

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